Life is a game, take it seriously

Local Distance Learning in Object Recognition

In Computer Vision, Paper Talk on February 8, 2015 at 11:59 am

by Li Yang Ku (Gooly)

learning distance

Unsupervised clustering algorithms such as K-means are often used in computer vision as a tool for feature learning. It can be used in different stages in the visual pathway. Running K-means algorithm on a small region of pixel patches might result in finding a lot of patches with edges of different orientation while running K-means on a larger HOG feature might result in finding contours of meaningful parts of objects such as faces if your training data consists of selfies.  However, although convenient and simple as it seems, we have to keep in mind that these unsupervised clustering algorithms are all based on the assumption that a meaningful metric is provided. Without this criteria, clustering suffers from the “no right answer” problem. Whether the algorithm should group a set of images into clusters that contain objects with the same type or the same color is ambiguous and not well defined. This is especially true when your observation vectors are consists of values representing different types of properties.

distance learning

This is where Distance Learning comes into play. In the paper “Distance Metric Learning, with Application to Clustering with Side-Information” written by Eric Xing, Andrew Ng, Michael Jordan and Stuart Russell, a matrix A that represents the distance metric is learned through convex optimization using user inputs specifying grouping examples. This matrix A can either be full or diagonal. When learning a diagonal matrix, the values simply represent the weights of each feature. If the goal is to group objects with similar color, features that can represent color will have a higher weight in the matrix. This metric learning approach was shown to improve clustering on the UCI data set.

visual association

In another work “Recognition by Association via Learning Per-exemplar Distances” written by Tomasz Malisiewicz and Alexei Efros, the object recognition problem is posed as data association. A region in the image is classified by associating it with a small set of exemplars based on visual similarity. The authors suggested that the central question for recognition might not be “What is it?” but “What is it like?”. In this work, 14 different type of features under 4 categories, shape, color, texture and location are used. Unlike the single distance metric learned in the previous work, a separate distance function that specifies the weights put on these 14 different type of features is learned for each exemplar. Some exemplars like cars will not be as sensitive to color as exemplars like sky or grass, therefore having a different distance metric for each exemplar becomes advantageous in such situations. These class of work that defines separate distance metrics are called Local Distance Learning.

instance distance learning

In a more recent work “Sparse Distance Learning for Object Recognition Combining RGB and Depth Information” by Kevin Lai, Liefeng Bo, Xiaofeng Ren, and Dieter Fox, a new approach called Instance Distance Learning is introduced, which instance is referred to one single object. When classifying a view, the view to object distance is compared simultaneously to all views of an object instead of a nearest neighbor approach. Besides learning weight vectors on each feature, weights on views are also learned. In addition, a L1 regularization is used instead of a L2 regularization in the Lagrange function. This generates a sparse weight vector which has a zero term on most views. This is quite interesting in the sense that this approach finds a small subset of representative views for each instance. In fact as shown in the image below, with just 8% of the exemplar data a similar decision boundaries can be achieved. This is consistent to what I talked about in my last post; human brain doesn’t store all the possible views of an object nor does it store a 3D model of the object, instead it stores a subset of views that are representing enough to recognize the same object. This work demonstrates one possible way of finding such subset of views.

instance distance learning decision boundaries

 

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